How to stop someone from intimidating you


15-Dec-2019 01:29

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The acceptable, comfortable distance between nonfamily members during regular conversations varies by culture, but most North Americans feel threatened if you stand closer than 4 feet. People feel intimidated by those who project a sense of entitlement or ownership to the physical objects around them.

Leaning in the doorway of someone else's office or sitting on the edge of someone else's desk can be threatening.

Some people feel uncomfortable around their friends' or partner's parents.

Hopefully this answer isn't too unsatisfying, but I think in these cases the way to feel more comfortable around these people is to face your fear and just get more used to talking to them.

For example, introduce your request with a phrase such as, "I'll understand completely if you're unable to help ..." And mean it. Be aware of relative height positions during conversations.

Though sometimes we mistakenly think that everyone who dresses or acts a certain way is going to look down on us.

Don't interrupt when someone is speaking to you, even when you believe that person is wrong.

Show that you can really listen and keep an open mind to alternate points of view. Let people know you'll be OK with a negative response from them before you make a request.

Some socially awkward types have the problem of being a bit too uneasy around certain types of people.

Here are the big ones: When someone is intimidated by really outgoing people it's that they're worried about having to talk to them and feeling really overwhelmed and like they won't be able to keep up or know what to say.You get used to them, start to see them as normal people, and learn firsthand that they have flaws and quirks and insecurities like everyone else.